On the Value of Committing to an Ongoing Financial Education

maxresdefault (2)Many financial advisors are fond of explaining to clients how, for all intents and purposes, the most essential concepts and advice relating to personal finance are so simple that they can fit on a single, standard-size index card. In terms of the most basic and straightforward advice, there are few who would disagree with this notion and it certainly seems to be intuitively true that a practical approach to financial planning ought to be entirely uncomplicated. As the Groza Learning Center might point out, it is not often made clear by those fond of this particular maxim whether or not any of the information included on the index card will ever have to be replaced or otherwise updated.

The overwhelming majority of educators would be quite likely to agree that education, just like finance, requires an ever-changing approach in order to yield the best possible outcome. While the same basic principles will remain similar as time goes by, adjustments will have to be made and changes implemented based on the development of new and more effective practices and strategies. The same is true in finance, where the principles may remain largely unchanged but will have to be reviewed and adapted on a regular basis in order to generate the best possible outcome.

If, for example, an educator were to keep the same index card in his or her back pocket for the entirety of a teaching career, it is quite likely for that teacher’s students to be adversely affected by the lack of educational adaptation when compared to students of a teacher who has adapted his or her approach over time. Education, regardless of the subject matter, should always be considered an ongoing process.

April 19th, 2016 by